Welcome to  umaa
uRASENKE MIDORIKAI ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

Log in

WAGASHI BASICS

 RECENT RECIPES

RECIPES

<< First  < Prev   1   2   Next >  Last >> 
  • 2019-09-08 12:59 PM | Carmen Johnson (Administrator)

    Kimika Soko Takechi
    Larry Sokyo Tiscornia
    teatimes@chanoyu.com

    INGREDIENTS

    • azuki (adzuki) beans 200gm (0.4lb)
    • sugar 200gm (0.4lb)
      either white or 1/2 white & 1/2 dark brown
    • light corn syru

    PREPARATION

    1. Check the beans and discard any small rocks or those that are broken or off-color. Rinse the beans in cold water several times and soak overnight in plenty of cold water. To cook - drain the beans and rinse again in fresh water. Drain, transfer to a heavy bottom pot and cover with fresh cold water. Bring to a boil and skim off any foam that forms. Boil until cooked (1 to 2-hours depending on the beans)
    2. Drain the water from the beans and add the sugar. Cook until the sugar is dissolved. Turn off the heat and let sit for approx. 8 hours.
    3. Heat the beans, stir with a wooden spoon and cook until the beans thicken and there is no more liquid left. Add a small amount (approx. 5% of bean total) of light corn syrup and cook until it is thick. Turn off the heat and continue to stir. Remove to a dish and cover with a damp towel until cool.

    OPTIONAL: You can add about 1/3 koshian (smooth bean paste) to 2/3 tsubuan for a different finished texture. Add the koshian during the final cooking before adding the corn syrup.
  • 2019-03-02 1:41 PM | Carmen Johnson (Administrator)

    Kimika Soko Takechi
    Larry Sokyo Tiscornia
    teatimes@chanoyu.com

    sasamaki

    INGREDIENTS

    • kuzu (Eng. kudzu [Pueraria lobata] 100gm (3.5oz)
    • white sugar 50gm (1.8oz)
    • brown sugar 50gm (1.8oz)
    • kurosato (black sugar) 100gm (3.5oz)
    • water 400cc (1.6c)
    • sasa (bamboo leaves)

    PREPARATION

    1. Pick small sized leaves (available dried in Asian markets). Wash well in cold water and soak in fresh cold water overnight. Scrub both sides well with a soft brush or sponge and rinse again. Have a pot of boiling water ready and place the leaves in the hot water for approximately 15 seconds (4 or 5 at a time is fine). Cool in cold water and keep in fresh cold water until ready to use. When ready to make the sweets wipe the leaves with a damp cloth to remove excess moisture. (Note - If the leaves are too wide they may have to be narrowed to 3 1/2" or so. It's easy to do by just tearing lengthwise and scissors will also come in handy to shorten the length if needed.)
    2. If the black sugar pieces are too large you can cut into small pieces with a heavy knife or genty crush with a mallet. Mix with some of the 400cc of water from the recipe and in a heavy bottom pan dissolve over low heat. Remove from the heat and let cool.
    3. Dissolve the kuzu in the remaining water and mix until all of the lumps are gone.
    4. Place the kuzu/water mixture in a heavy bottom pot and add all of the sugar, including the dissolved black sugar that has been cooled. Over low/medium heat stir the kuzu mixture continuously with a wooden spoon. The mixture will begin to thicken in big "clumps" but don't worry. (If the mixture gets too hot and thickens too quickly, remove the pan from the heat and continue to stir.) Place it back on the heat and continue to stir and cook until the mixture is very thick and somewhat clears. Place the pan in a larger pan of hot water to keep the mixture from hardening.
    5. Using a couple of spoons, place some of the hot kuzu mixture (40 to 45gm) into a bamboo leaf and wrap the leaf around the kuzu to form a package. Tuck one end into the package and let it come out the other end. Pull the end that you just stuck through the other side and gently pull. Trim any extra folded leaf that is sticking out. Place the packages into a cloth lined steamer and steam over high heat for 10 minutes. Remove from the steamer and let cool. When the sweets are cool they can be placed in a lidded plastic container that has a damp cloth on the bottom. Another damp cloth can be placed on top of the sweets. One recipe makes approximately 10-12 sweets.

    NOTE: If you plan to serve these sweets cold they should be placed in the refrigerator for no more than 1 to 1 1/2 hours before serving. They can also be served on top of a bowl of ice. If left in the refrigerator too long they will become hard and rubbery.
  • 2019-03-02 1:23 PM | Carmen Johnson (Administrator)

    Kimika Soko Takechi
    Larry Sokyo Tiscornia
    teatimes@chanoyu.com


    INGREDIENTS

    • kanten (agar agar) 14gm (0.5oz) or 2 sticks
    • water 900cc (3.6c.)
    • sugar 300gm (10.5oz)
    • mizuame (or light corn syrup) 2T
    • koshian (sweet smooth bean paste) approx. 30gm (1oz) per sweet
    • yellow food color - approx. 2 drops
    • umeshu (plum wine) 1T

    PREPARATION

    1. Wash the kanten well in cold water and remove any black/brown specks. Soak in fresh cold water to cover for a couple of hours. Squeeze the excess water from the kanten and tear into small pieces. Place the kanten and water in a heavy bottom pan and cook over low heat until the kanten is dissolved.
    2. Add the sugar and mizuame, or corn syrup. Continue to cook until the sugar is completely dissolved.
    3. Strain through a fine strainer and return to the pot and cook a little longer. (Be careful that you do not cook too long or the kanten will become too hard.)
    4. Turn off the heat and stir in umeshu and a small amount of yellow food color to achieve a golden color. Stir well.
    5. Pour into a parchment-lined nagashikan mold, that is approximately 6" X 7" X 2" (1000cc [4c.]) and let cool. Bubbles can be removed by running a piece of Japanese washi paper over the surface. (Note: Any similar size glass or plastic container may be used.)
    6. Form the bean paste into tawara (bale) shapes.
    7. Using a serrated tofu knife, cut the kanten into long, thin strips. The strips should be long enough to wrap completely around the formed bean paste. Carefully wrap the kanten around the bean paste. The sweets can be chilled before serving. Place on a towel to blot any excess moisture before serving

    NOTE: Any non acidic flavoring can also be added when adding the color. Acid will cause the kanten not to gel properly.
  • 2019-02-03 3:16 PM | Carmen Johnson (Administrator)

    Glenn A. Sorei Pereira
    GAPereira@aol.com


    Named by Hounsai Daisosho みどりの星 midori no hoshi (green stars),this sweet was designed by Midorikai alum Glenn A. Sorei Pereira of Boston, MA, for the 40th Midorikai Reunion tea in Honolulu, Hawaii on July 19, 2010.

    INGREDIENTS

    • Powered kanten 12g
    • Water 600 cc (2.4c)
    • Granulated sugar 700g (25oz)
    • Light corn syrup 80g (3oz)
    • Limoncello 4 tbs
    • Blue food coloring 3 drops
    • Nagashikan (lined mold) 5 ½" x 6"
    • Kinpaku (gold leaf) a few sprinkles on each sweet

    PREPARATION

    1. Place kanten and water in a heavy bottom pan and cook over low/medium heat until it reaches a light boil. It is important to stir continuously.
    2. Add sugar and stir until dissolved and once again bring to a light boil. Add corn syrup and continue to stir. Once again bring to a light boil. Turn off heat and add limoncello and coloring.
    3. Ladle hot mixture into nagashikan that has been rinsed in cold water. Bubbles or residue that form on top can be removed by running a piece of Japanese washi paper over the top. Let cool at room temperature until solid.
    4. Remove from nagashikan and cut length into thirds. Cut each third into fifths with serrated tofu knife. Refrigerate to chill and sprinkle with kinpaku before serving.
    5. Makes 15 sweets.
  • 2019-02-03 3:10 PM | Carmen Johnson (Administrator)

    Kimika Soko Takechi
    Larry Sokyo Tiscornia
    teatimes@chanoyu.com

    INGREDIENTS

    • nagaimo (long mountain yam) 85gm (3oz)
    • granulated sugar 140gm (4.9oz)
    • joshinko [komenoko] rice flour 100gm (3.5oz)
    • water - approx. 2T - 4T
    • baking powder 3/4tsp
    • dried yomogi (mugwort) approx. 1/2 loose Tbl.
    • optional flavor or color

    PREPARATION

    1. Peel the long mountain yam and remove any brown spots that remain.
    2. Grate the yam into a large bowl using a fine grater. Using your fingers, mix the sugar into the grated yam in small increments, blending well until the sugar is dissolved and no lumps remain.
    3. Mix in 1T of the water that has been mixed with the dried yomogi and allowed to reconstitute for a couple of minutes. Add 1T more water then add the sifted rice flour and baking powder, mixing until the flour is well blended and no lumps remain. Mix until the mixture is like a smooth pancake batter. More water can be added if necessary. (The amount of water may vary depending on the temperature, location, etc. Be careful that the batter doesn't become too thin or watery.
    4. If using flavor or color they can be added at this point. Various colors such as pink in the spring and green in the summer can be used to evoke a feeling of the season:
      • Japanese matcha, powdered green tea, can be used for a natural green color (For this recipe 1 1/2tsp matcha can be mixed with the rice flour before mixing with the yam).
      • Japanese umeshu, plum wine, can be used as a flavoring during the spring and summer.
      • Daitokuji natto, salty fermented black beans, can be cut into small pieces and mixed in the batter.
      • Lightly roasted white or black sesame seeds can also be mixed in the batter.
      • Finely chopped crystalized ginger or grated orange zest can also be used.
    5. Prepare a steamer placing a damp cotton cloth on the steamer surface.
    6. Pour the batter into a 12cm X 15cm (5" X 6") parchment paper lined nagashikan, stainless steel lined mold, (with the liner removed) or another suitable parchment lined container.
    7. Place the mold in the steamer and place a cotton towel under the lid to absorb excess moisture. Steam over medium high heat for approx. 15 to 20 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in the center of the cake comes out fairly dry. Keep the lid ajar for the first 5 mintues, or so, to prevent cracking. (The steaming time may also vary depending on the size and thickness of the mold.)
    8. Remove the mold from the steamer. Wring excess moisture from the cloth that is in the steamer and return it to the steamer surface.
    9. Carefully remove the cake from the mold by lifting it with the parchment paper. Without removing the parchment paper return the cake to the steamer and steam over medium high heat for about 10 minutes longer. When ready, remove from the steamer and let the cake cool on a wire rack.
    10. When cool, carefully remove the parchment paper and cut into serving size pieces. For cutting, either a taut piece of wire or thick nylon fishing line, works best. A knife tends to pull and smash the cake. If using a knife the finished sweet can be turned upside down and cut from the bottom side for a nicer look on the top.

      This recipe makes about 8 - 10 smaller chanoyu sweets. This recipe can be doubled and a larger nagashikan can also be used.
  • 2019-02-02 8:45 PM | Carmen Johnson (Administrator)

    Kimika Soko Takechi
    Larry Sokyo Tiscornia
    teatimes@chanoyu.com


    INGREDIENTS

    PREPARATION

    • Wash the kanten and tear it into small pieces. Soak in cold water until it softens a bit.
    • Cook the kanten and water over low heat until it is dissolved and then add the sugar. Cook until everything is dissolved and then let cool. Use this liquid to moisten your hands when working with the mochi rice. (If small pieces of kanten remain, the mixture can be strained.)
    • Quickly rinse the cherry leaves in fresh cold water and gently pat dry.
    • Use approximately 20gm (0.7oz) koshian and 25gm (0.9oz) to 30gm (1.2oz) rice. Flatten out the rice and wrap it around an an ball. Roll between the palms of the hands to make even shapes. Wrap a cherry leaf around the mochi ball. (The dull side of the leaf is on the outside.)
    • If you don't have salted cherry leaves, you can put the rice ball between two camellia leaves and you have tsubaki mochi.

    for mochi

    • mochi (sweet) rice 400cc (1.6c)
    • boiling water 400cc (1.6c)
    • sugar 150gm (5.28oz)
    • red food color

    PREPARATION

    • Remove any small rocks, etc. from the rice. Wash it well in fresh cold water and soak it overnight in ample cold water.
    • Drain the rice and place it in a cloth-lined steamer (remember to place a towel under the lid). Steam over high heat for 30 to 45-minutes or until the rice is cooked and is soft.
    • Dissolve the sugar in the boiling water and add red color (approx. 3 drops) to achieve desired pink color.
    • Remove the cooked rice to a glass or stainless steel bowl and pour the boiling water over it. Using a wooden spoon, mix the rice and hot water well.
    • Cover the rice with a damp cloth and then the entire bowl in foil (to help keep it warm). Let the rice sit for 1-hour, uncover and mix again and it is then ready to use for the sakura mochi sweets.
    • When you mix the rice you can push it a bit to break down some of the grains to make it slightly more sticky. (Makes approx. 30 sweets.)

    for salted cherry leaves

    Salted cherry leaves can be purchased at some markets in Japan.

    PREPARATION

    • Pick fresh cherry leaves from the yaezakura (double cherry tree) just after the blossoms fall from the tree and the leaves are the right size. The longer you wait the harder the leaves will be.
    • Wash the leaves well in fresh cold water, drain and blanch in boilng water quickly (in and out).
    • Separate the leaves in a cloth lined steamer and gently steam for a minute or two. Remove from the steamer and place in fresh cold water to cool. Drain. Layer the leaves in a glass (or non corrosive) container sprinkling salt between each layer. Salt the top layer as well. Place a weight over the top and remove the weight after a day. The leaves will keep well in the refrigerator (or they may be frozen).

    for tsubaki mochi (camellia mochi)


    • Prepare mochi rice as for sakura mochi. The red food coloring can also be omitted.
    • Wash fresh camellia leaves well in cold water and pat dry. Cut off both pointed ends to square off.
    • Wrap the mochi rice around an an ball as for sakura mochi. Place between two camellia leaves (the shinny side of the leaves are on the inside).
    • NOTE : The leaves are removed before eating the sweet
  • 2019-02-02 6:47 PM | Carmen Johnson (Administrator)

    Kimika Soko Takechi
    Larry Sokyo Tiscornia
    teatimes@chanoyu.com


    INGREDIENTS

    • kuzu (kudzu) 1 part / 50gm (1.75oz)
    • sugar 2 parts / 100gm (3.5oz)
    • water 4 parts / 200cc (0.8c.)
    • pink koshian (smooth bean paste) approx. 20gm (3/4oz) per sweet

    PREPARATION

    1. Prepare approximately 20gm (3/4oz) pink koshian balls that will be the center of the sweet.
    2. Dissolve the kuzu in the water until all of the lumps are dissolved.
    3. Place the kuzu/water in a heavy bottom pot (enameled cast iron is best) and mix in the sugar. Cook over low/medium heat, stirring continuously with a wooden spoon, until the mixture thickens and begins to clear. *If the heat is too high, and the mixture thickens too quickly, remove the pot from the heat and continue to stir. When it cools a bit, return the pot to the heat.
    4. When clear, remove the pot from the heat and place in a pan of hot water to keep the mixture from hardening. Using a wooden spoon, take some of the hot kuzu (approximately 25gm [1oz]) and place on your finger tips (have a pan of cold water ready to cool your fingers). Place the an ball on top of the kuzu, turn upside down and form the kuzu around the an ball. Pinch the kuzu to enclose the an ball completely.
      *You can also wrap the formed sweet in plastic wrap, twisting the top closed, for a nice even shape.
    5. Place in a preheated cloth lined steamer and steam over med/high heat for 5 minutes or so. Remove from the steamer and allow to cool. Makes approximately 10-12 sweets.
    6. NOTE: mizubotan can be served chilled but should not be kept in the refrigerator too long or they will become "rubbery."
  • 2019-02-02 6:32 PM | Carmen Johnson (Administrator)

    Kimika Soko Takechi
    Larry Sokyo Tiscornia
    teatimes@chanoyu.com


    INGREDIENTS

    • kuzu (Eng. kudzu [Pueraria lobata] 100gm (3.5oz)
    • white sugar 50gm (1.8oz)
    • brown sugar 50gm (1.8oz)
    • kurosato (black sugar) 100gm (3.5oz)
    • water 400cc (1.6c)
    • yurine (lily bulb) or nagaimo (long yam)

    PREPARATION

    1. If the black sugar pieces are too large you can cut into small pieces with a heavy knife or smash with a mallet. Mix with a small amount of the 400cc of water from the recipe and in a heavy bottom pan dissolve over low heat. Remove from the heat and let cool.
    2. Dissolve the kuzu in the remaining water and mix until all of the lumps are gone.
    3. Place the kuzu/water mixture in a heavy bottom pot and add all of the sugar, including the dissolved black sugar that has been cooled. Over low/medium heat stir the kuzu mixture continuously with a wooden spoon. The mixture will begin to thicken in big "clumps" but don't worry. (If the mixture gets too hot and thickens too quickly, remove the pan from the heat and continue to stir.) Place it back on the heat and continue to stir and cook until the mixture is very thick and somewhat clears.
    4. Remove from the heat and mix in the slivers of lily bulb or long yam.
    5. Place the pan in a larger pan of hot water to keep the mixture from hardening.
    6. Place a piece of plastic wrap in a rice bowl. Using a wooden spoon, place some of the hot kuzu mixture (40 to 45gm) into the plastic wrap. Gather the ends, press out any air and gently twist to make a nice round shape.
    7. Invert the package and place into a cloth lined steamer and steam over high heat for 5 to 10 minutes. Remove from the steamer and let cool.
    8. When the sweets are cool they can be unwrapped and placed in a lidded plastic container that has a damp cloth on the bottom. Another damp cloth can be placed on top of the sweets. One recipe makes approximately 10 sweets.
    9. NOTE: It is best not to refrigerate the sweets as they will be rubbery.
  • 2019-02-02 6:14 PM | Carmen Johnson (Administrator)

    Kimika Soko Takechi
    Larry Sokyo Tiscornia
    teatimes@chanoyu.com


    The name of this sweet means "flower viewing dumplings" eaten during the cherry blossom season. The brown represents the tree trunk and branches, the green the leaves and the pink the blossoms.

    Make 3 batches of konashi (one with pink colored bean paste, one with azuki (adzuki) bean paste and one white bean paste flavored/colored with yomogi [mugwort]). You can either use fresh yomogi that has been washed, blanched and chopped, or the dried variety available in Japanese and Asian markets. If using the dried variety, soften in a little cold water before using. If yomogi is not available a nice flavor and color can be achieved by using matcha, powdered green tea.

    Divide each of the 3 batches into 15gm (1/2oz) pieces and roll into smooth balls in the palms of you hands using a little mitsu if needed. Using a bamboo skewer, first thread the brown ball, then the green one and finally the pink.

    If serving in a traditional dangobako (dumpling box) leave a little space between the green and pink ball so that the skewer can rest on the box divider. It is also a good idea to place the pink ball so that it covers the tip of the skewer.

    INGREDIENTS

    konashi

    • koshian (sweet smooth bean paste) 300gm (10.6oz) (a little harder than usual)
    • white all purpose flour 30gm (approx. 3T)
    • mochiko (sweet rice flour) 3gm (approx. 1tsp)
    • granulated sugar 15gm (approx. 1/2oz)
    • mitsu (sugar water syrup)

    PREPARATION

    1. For the mitsu : This sugar water syrup can be made in advance and kept in the refrigerator.) Dissolve equal parts of sugar and water in a saucepan over low heat. When the sugar is melted transfer to a glass container and let it cool.
    2. For the konashi: Knead the flour and mochiko into the koshian until it is completely incorporated. Place the mixture in a cloth lined steamer and steam over medium/high heat for approximately 15 minutes or until all of the raw flour taste is gone.
    3. Remove the cloth, and bean paste, from the steamer and knead further using clean damp cotton towels. As you knead the bean paste, slowly incorporate the sugar. (If the bean paste gets too sticky it can be kneaded using plastic film like Saran Wrap [other brands may leave a plastic taste].)
    4. Once the sugar has been completely incorporated, and the bean paste has cooled slightly, the mitsu can be added. Continuing to use a damp towel knead in a small amount of the mitsu (approx. 1 to 2tsp).
    5. Coat the outside of the konashi with some mitsu and place in a glass bowl to cool completely for several hours. The bowl can be covered with plastic wrap after it cools to prevent it from drying out. When ready to use, knead further using a little mitsu on your hands to prevent sticking.
    6. NOTE - If coloring or flavoring is going to be used it can be kneaded in after the mitsu.
    7. One recipe makes approximately 20 dango (dumplings).
  • 2019-02-02 6:06 PM | Carmen Johnson (Administrator)

    Glenn A. Sorei Pereira
    GAPereira@aol.com


    INGREDIENTS

    gyuhi skins

    • shiratamako (sweet rice flour) - 50gm (1.76oz)
    • water - 100cc (0.4C.)
    • joshinko (rice flour) - 70gm (2.46oz)
    • water - 130cc (0.52oz)
    • sugar - 100gm (3.52oz)
    • mochiko - as needed
    • gobo (burdock root) - as needed
    • carrot - as needed
    • red coloring - enough to make some of the dough pink (or separate batch)

    misoan (miso flavored sweet bean paste)

    • saikyo miso (sweet "Kyoto" miso) - as needed to personal taste
    • lima beans or Japanese tebo beans - 1 to 3 pounds
    • sugar - as needed to personal taste
    • mizuame or light Karo corn syrup - 5 or more tablespoons

    gobo no satozuke (candied burdock root)

    • gobo - depending on how many sweets are being made
    • carrots - depending on how many sweets are being made
    • water - enough to cover gobo/carrot
    • sugar - double the water plus more

    PREPARATION

    gobo no satozuke (carrot can also be done at the same time, if used)

    1. Wash and peel gobo and cut into lengths so that it will extend beyond both edges of the gyuhi rounds by about 1/2cm on each side when placed on the middle of the round and 2 or 3cm square.
    2. After cutting, soak in water for 1/2 hour and then steam until soft through (if undercooked at this point and you proceed there will be no way to correct so you will have to begin again).
    3. Dissolve 2 parts of sugar in 1 part of water in a pan and place gobo in and bring to a low boil (do not boil too strongly so as to raise the syrup to the candy stage).
    4. The quantity of sugar/water syrup should be enough to cover gobo.
    5. Cook for about 15 minutes to 1/2 hour and remove from heat and cool with gobo remaining in the sugar/water syrup.
    6. When completely cool add a couple of tablespoons of sugar to the pan and bring to the boil again to dissolve the newly added sugar.
    7. Remove from heat and cool.
    8. Repeat this process about 10 more times over two or three days, each time adding more sugar.
    9. During the final cooking have a dish of fine granulated sugar ready (caster sugar works well).
    10. Using chopsticks lift 2 or 3 pieces of gobo from pan and allow excess sugar solution to drip off.
    11. Place in dish with sugar and completely cover.
    12. Lift out gobo and place on flat tray and let cool.
      (Note - Do not let gobo cool after last cooking but make sure to place it in the granulated sugar while hot.)

    misoan (miso flavored sweet bean paste)

    1. Follow regular an recipe except add saikyo miso to an after sugar is added. Add miso to personal taste. Start by adding a little and work your way up.
    2. Misoan should be very soft unlike an that is molded.

    gyuhi skins

    about 10 to 14 pcs
    1. Combine shiratamako and 100cc of water.
    2. Combine joshinko and sugar in 130cc of water and mix well to dissolve all lumps.
    3. Combine the shiratamako and joshinko mixtures and cook over medium heat until it gets very thick and doughy.
    4. Place the mixture that is now quite thick on a piece of Saran Wrap, or other cellophane wrap, lightly dusted with mochiko to prevent sticking.
    5. Carefully fold the four sides over the dough, one at a time, pressing gently to eliminate all air bubbles.
    6. The wrap should have no air spaces between it and the dough.
    7. Steam for about 10 minutes or until cooked completely through.
    8. (If the mixture is spread flat on the wrap it will cook quickly and completely through.)
    9. Remove from steamer and let cool for a few minutes to make handling easier (separate small amount to be tinted pink or make a separate pink batch).
    10. While still hot, roll flat on a board covered with mochiko to prevent sticking.
    11. Roll out to about 2 or 3mm (1/8" - 3/16") thick.
    12. Continue to use mochiko on board and roller to prevent sticking but being careful not to use too much.
    13. Flour a round shaped cutter or the rim of a rice bowl, about 10-12cm (4") in diameter, and cut out rounds of the dough.
    14. Place on flat surface until ready to assemble.

    ASSEMBLY

    1. Tint some of the gyuhi dough pink and roll and cut into diamond shapes.
    2. Place a pink diamond on a round white gyuhi skin.
    3. Place one carrot and one gobo on center of diamond/round (or just 2 gobo).
    4. Place spoon full of misoan on top of gobo/carrot.
    5. Gently fold over gyuhi in half making sure the top covers the bottom.
    6. Be sure to dust off excess mochiko.
    7. For best results hishihanabiramochi should be assembled just before serving. The salt in the miso will begin leaching water from the gyuhi dough and will be come sticky and "sweaty" the longer it sits.
<< First  < Prev   1   2   Next >  Last >> 

The Urasenke Midorikai Alumni Association is a United States 501(c)(3) non profit public charity. Donations and bequests are tax-deductible as permitted by law. Why not join or donate now?

2143 Powell Street
San Francisco, CA 94133

Contact UMAA

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software